Leaders We Deserve is changing its role

August 5, 2022

After fifteen years and over a million contacts (‘hits’) Leaders We Deserve remains an important way for me to share my ideas about leadership and creativity. Increasingly I have seen the benefits of rousing myself from my blogging slumbers to ask the painful question whether it needs some kind of updating.

WordPress has changed. That’s for sure, and I am currently learning how to drive the new supercharged model, demonstrating all the signs of a driver who should still be displaying L-plates

Pause, to see if I remember how to produce the moves leading into a side-road where I parked my pictures.

My new driving certificate

Eureka!

I reverse out of the lay-by into the main text highway with little unintended consequences. I Concentrate on the road ahead. Where am I going? Is this a test-drive with no other purpose of learning about the controls?

No, I was telling you about how Leaders We Deserve now has company among my various modes of travel along the electronic highways and byways.

For example, there is the recently born infant Everyday Creativity, with its weekly newsletter you are already receiving as followers of LWD.

Then there is the new (to me) podcast TudoRama, a must-listen for the rapidly growing audience (current word) whose members listen to the messages, heirs to receivers of radio broadcasts.

As an interim measure you should be receiving the newsletter regularly as a follower of LWD.

Longer term the various vehicles will rumble into action, with posts on creative leadership still to be found through the efforts of this old warhorse Leaders We Deserve, and posts on Everyday Creativity as the infant learns to walk before it can run.

As for TudoRama, who knows? Except I am sure it will build up a network interacting with its poddlers, long after prescriptive text insists I change what I’ve written to toddlers.


Leaders we deserve: Choosing a new prime minister

July 12, 2022

Leaders we deserve examine the process and the leaders involved in the election in July 2022 of a replacement for Boris Johnson as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland

We begin with the build up to the election process, at the start of the Jubilee celebrations in early June

Wednesday 1 June 2022
What will the new month bring? A week of royal celebrations. A month in which a new Prime Minister is appointed?

Thursday 2 June
As expected. Near black-out of non-jubilee news

Friday 3 June
PM and Carrie booed by royalist crowd outside the memorial service. Commentators see this as dangerous to Boris Johnson, already weakened by the long-running ‘Partygate’ allegations.

Saturday 4 June
Repeated items of joyful Jubilee celebrations reduce news of the ‘Boos for Boris’ story

Sunday 5 June
The royal celebrations have transported the country to a land beyond time. It will soon be time to re-enter the 21st century.

Monday 6 June
Boris Johnson’s fate is presumed to be settled. The news swamps all other headlines.

Tuesday 7 June
Those headlines continue.

Sunday 12 June
More troubles for Govt plans and actions. Rail strikes, leaked reaction to healthy food study, refugee resettlement plans. Major financial backer claims Govt struggling with a Johnson ‘cult’.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/jun/12/tory-donors-and-polarised-party-losing-faith-in-johnson-cult?

Tuesday 14 June
The first refugee flight to Ruanda has now become a focus for protests. The rejected food recommendations also retain potency. And the Titanic iceberg of cost of living and political realities get closer and closer.

Wednesday 15 June
The first flight to Ruanda postponed after interventions in the high court which succeeded but then halted by the international Court of Human Rights which stayed the Govt’s hand.

Thursday 16 June
A flurry of political stories. Mostly minor in isolation, but collectively damaging. Lord Geidt, PM’s ethics advisor resigns after being placed in an untenable position by the PM. Financial outlook worsens. The rail strike looms.

Friday 17 June
Boris Johnson pays an unprompted visit to Ukraine. Some criticism that it is largely self-promotional. A group of red-wall MPs were expecting him to attend a levelling-up event.

Monday 20 June
PM has minor operation, leaving Dominic Raab in charge of the Govt response to the start of the rail strike.

Tuesday 21 June
First day of the rail strike. Strange day for Govt to announce the removal of salary cap for top earners.

Wednesday 22 June
News headlines shared between rail strike and inflation figures.
Trump investigation has testimonies of Trump’s direct and sustained efforts to overturn the Presidential election result with ‘the big lie’ .
Major earthquake in Afghanistan scarcely reaches the news headlines.

Thursday 23 June
Happy Brexit day. For some. Sixth anniversary of the fateful vote.
The by-elections in Wakefield and Tiverton are expected to bring poor results for the Govt.

Friday 24 June
Dreadful losses to labour and the Liberal Democrats. Conservative Party chairman Oliver Dowden resigns, says ‘somebody must take responsibility’.

Saturday 25 June
The PM speaking to the BBC says he humbly accepts his share of the Govt’s difficulties. But the quote catching attention is that people shouldn’t expect a change in his personality.

Tuesday 28 June
Metropolitan police placed under special measures order by police watchdog. The Met currently leaderless after the forced resignation of Commissioner Cressida Dick. No mention of its investigation into Partygate.
Dame Deborah James, cancer campaigner, dies.

Friday 1 July

Hong Kong anniversary. Boris Johnson gives China a piece of his mind. Says he doesn’t use it any more.
Conservative MP Chris Pincher resigns from his Govt role after a sleazy night-club scene, and is quickly suspended from the party.

Saturday 2 July
National news headlines anticipate a wave of strike actions to add to the Govt’s problems. Its ‘don’t mention COVID’ policy is also being weakened by news of a 30% increase in cases in a week.

Monday 4 July
Headlines reports on growing dissatisfaction with Boris Johnson’s conduct, and on his falling poll ratings.

Tuesday 5 July
A mass shooting in a Chicago suburb at an Independence Day parade.
The Govt forced into further denials in the ‘what Boris Johnson knew about Chris Pincher’ story

Wednesday 6 July
News headlines are summed up as Johnson on the brink.
Remarkable day of political action. No of Govt resignations since yesterday clocked up 42. PM rejected pleas from cabinet colleagues to resign.

Thursday 7 July
Headlines: even more unanimous that the PM is clinging to power. But these were similar during much of June.
12.30pm. Facing multiple resignations Boris Johnson speaks behind the lectern announcing his resignation as leader of the Conservative party. It later emerges his speech agreed by a deputation was unilaterally altered in his actual speech.

The story so far

In the space of a week, Boris Johnson has lost his most difficult battle, which was of retaining the support of his cabinet ministers and the wider group of MPs in Parliament. He makes a grudging admission he has resigned as party leader, clinging to the role of Prime Minister in a temporary or acting Capacity. The action now swings to the process of evicting him, and bringing in his successor.

Leaders we deserve will be covering the leadership election. Audio versions of the proceedings can be found on the regular podcasts from TudoRama.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1945222


On identifying sporting talent: The Calthorpe Hypothesis

September 1, 2017

img_08241

In my new book, Seconds Out, I describe a fictional idea known as The Calthorpe Hypothesis. It indicates how sporting talent might be identified, and how it transfers from one sport to another. As sometimes happens, fiction can become a reality.

Seconds Out is a thriller with the usual ingredients of a super villain with a plan to dominate the world, a valient team intent on stopping him, few ghostly interventions, and a protagonist facing academic ruin if his research turns out badly. For the last point only, I was able to draw on personal experiences.

The Calthorpe Hypothesis

In the book, the research is based on The Calthorpe Hypothesis, a concept I invented as supporting a theory which might turn out to be completely wrong.

As the story developed, I became intrigued by the possibility that the fictional hypothesis could actually have more credibility in the real world than I originally intended it to have.

Chess Boxing

Sometimes an idea buzzes around in irritating fashion, giving you no peace of mind. It often helps to share your thoughts with someone else.

Chess boxing” I said to Susan one evening, as we were setting out to review progress on construction of the East Cheadle bypass relief road being conducted outside our front door.

“Sorry” she said “I thought you said Chess boxing. That sounds weird.”

“I did say Chess boxing. It’s a new sport. You have boxers who fight and then sit down to play a game of chess. It is the perfect contest requiring brain, brawn, courage and cunning.

“I suppose the chess players put gloves on after a game for fighting, and the boxers take their gloves off to move the chess pieces.”

“Whatever,” I said. “Anyway, it’s going to become big. And it is exactly where we should be looking to recruit much-needed new members for our Chess Club.

I am pinning my hopes on chess boxing as way of restoring my fading academic reputation, but I decide not to mention that to Susan for the moment.

As the story develops, I learn more about the Calthorpe Hypothesis in a conference on sporting excellence

I return to my room to dig more deeply into the implications of the Calthorpe hypothesis. With references from Greg’s paper, I quickly find what I am looking for. Professor Calthorpe is no longer with us. He was based in a department of sports science in Australia’s remote Northern Territories. His largely ignored work suggests it is possible to identify characteristics that suggest which sports are particularly complementary. He collected evidence from a range of Olympic sports such as weightlifting, swimming, gymnastics, and hurdling.

I can hardly sleep as I see the unnoticed implications of Calthorpe’s insights and consider how they will increase my academic survival prospects.

My first success came in the identification of Tim, a promising chess player who according to my ideas, could become successful at both chess and boxing. Tim agrees to become involved:

“I’ll think on it,” he said. “I’m coming over to East Cheadle soon. Got to go now. Lift’s waiting for me out there. I’ll let you know.”

Even if he can only play the last games of the season it might make all the difference. But a half-promise is not enough. My search for players must go on.

He leaves before I have time to learn his name. But before he leaves he says his meeting is to contact an agent for when he turns professional. That sounds even more promising.

A scan of the results board tells me I have been in contact with a Tim Bolton, whose grade makes him eligible to play as our new secret weapon.

The story continues with many a twist, and a final encounter with the evil Lyman Groat. After 60,000 words, I had become convinced that the Calthorpe Hypothesis is not an entirely crazy idea.

Chess Boxing

Chess Boxing is alive and well, and I am grateful to guidance I received when writing Seconds Out from the London Chess Boxing organisation.

Why not capitalize on the idea?

Putting on my Business School hat, I am now developing a research proposal around the hypothesis, and submitting it to various sporting bodies in the real world, seeking sponsorship in identifying their next top athletes from other sports.

I may still do so, but I have given too much of the game away already. Readers of Seconds Out, or even subscribers to this blog post, may beat me to it. If you do so, please buy copies of the book for all your family and friends.

You can learn more about The Calthorpe Hypothesis from clicking this link to the book

 


Tennis Matters: I didn’t see the match-fixing

January 27, 2016

Tennis Matters Blue

Tennis is the latest sport to find itself embroiled in a corruption scandal.  It is not the problem that many observers expected
Leaders We Deserve was and still remains a blog about leadership and its implications in business.  Sport remains a useful way of ‘back engineering’ into business leadership.
In recent months sport has provided a wealth of examples of issues of global institutions failing in the most basic tenets of social corporate responsibility.  LWD subscribers will be able to track back to the most recent in athletics and football.
So now for tennis.  Over the last few weeks a story has developed in a rather predictable way.  First, a suggestion that a few low ranked players were involved in match fixing.
All credit to the BBC who can still produce world class reporting from time to time.
Silence from tennis authorities. The story builds
World number one Novak Djokovic speaks out suggesting it is a minor problem, although he was approached to fix a match early in his career.  First time I was awoken from my slumbers.  Novak was reported as dismissing the claims as sheer speculation.  oh, no  Novak.  Better to have stayed shtum.
More reports that the problem is widespread.
I start preparing this post.
Then an announcement that an official enquiry is to take place.
Tennis Matters
I recently self-published Tennis Matters, a little book of personal anecdotes. One seeded participant at the on-going Australian Open was given a copy to read.  It includes updates of several LWD posts.  I was advised by a legal friend to be careful of one of the posts which suggested there might be a drug problem in tennis.  So I listened to him, but there is still a hint of my concerns in Tennis Matters.
What I didn’t see coming 
What I didn’t see coming was a different sort of scandal.  Over the years there have been curious collapses from winning positions. Players have been fined for not trying.  Perhaps I didn’t want to see any suspicions.  I was more interested in the tensions that impair ‘thinking clearly under pressure’
This story has legs
You can find my slightly redacted comments about drugs in tennis in Tennis Matters.  Until I put out a revised version, this post will have to do.  I have a feeling the story deserves the customary not quite final words … Watch out for updates.
To be continued

The Commons vote on Syria: All human life was there and also a few political dilemmas

December 4, 2015

thatchertankOn December 2nd 2015, the elective representatives of the people of Great Britain and Northern Ireland debated for over ten hours and voted on the motion for overt military action in Syria.

The debate captured the whole range of human reactions from the authentic to the sycophantic, from the informed to the inflamed, from the arrogant to the resentful, from the committed to the confused.

Read the rest of this entry »


Steve Cram: “We appoint the leaders we deserve”

November 12, 2015

Steve CramNearly ten years ago, the first Leaders We Deserve post was published. Steve Cram suggests its relevance to the current problems of international sporting institutions

Hours after the monumental Press Conference and publication of WADA’s report [9 October 2015] Steve Cram gave his views on the crisis in sports management globally. He was asked why the whole situation had been allowed to go on unchecked. He replied that he was over fifty years old and had been living with drug doping since he was a young (and world-beating) athlete. We are all involved, he added. Media, athletes, administrators … we appointed them, we get the leaders we deserve.

Steve Cram gave a video interview [10 October 2015] in which he elaborated on his earlier remarks:

Cram says “we are all to blame” for allowing people “not up to scratch” to get into powerful positions in world sport, but believes that IAAF president Lord Coe is the man to enact change within athletics.

For those interested, the ABOUT box on our home page traces the conversations with subscribers since the blog started in 2016 and introduces its basic ideas:

The concept behind the Blog’s title is that leadership can be treated as a social concept. We create our leaders, and to some degree build them up and destroy them. In that sense, we are responsible for the influence that leaders exercise over the rest of us. If we understand more about this, we may better understand and mediate the behaviour of leaders (In very early discussion thread, someone rightly pointed out the importance of clarifying ‘who are the ‘we’ in all this).

My previous studies had been mainly of business leaders, but I could see how there could be some similarities, and some differences, in the leadership stories in other fields, such as politics, military and sporting endeavours.

 


You don’t need a Kindle to read Amazon eBooks

October 4, 2015

imageMessage from your editor and author of the eBook Tennis Matters

Many people still miss out on ordering eBooks from Amazon because they do not own a Kindle. I discovered this after a little market research in the clubhouse of a well-known Manchester tennis club. Tennis playing friends had told me they wanted to buy my recently published eBook Tennis Matters.

When I later asked them what they thought of it they became rather evasive in their replies.

Was it because they found my masterpiece less than the fascinating read I had promised it to be? Perhaps so, although I had received unsolicited praise that gives so much easing of the pain experienced by the bruised ego of the newly published author. One who had been pressed into proof-reading duties noted

l have just finished your book on my Kindle en route to London and thought you might be interested in my views. The light-hearted tone coupled with the personal reminiscences (the antique tennis racket story struck a chord), the appeal to the tennis fan (of which I am one), and the leadership/business school angle made for an interesting and appealing mix. Having started out of a sense of quasi-duty to a friend I enjoyed it more and more

Encouraged by the message, I conducted a little trial on a convenience sample of nine social tennis players. Four out of the nine gave as their reason for not ordering a copy of Tennis Matters

‘ I do not have a Kindle’

To their unconfined joy, I was able to reassure each of them of their error, sending them on their way with the news that there is no need to have a Kindle to read said masterpiece which is available for the astonishing price of £1.99 or rough equivalent in other currencies.

If you go to the link for Tennis Matters you too will see that you can download a FREE App for iPhone, Tablet, or PC and then use it to order your eCopies of any book (including Tennis Matters of course).

Then you too will learn of my battles with a wayward forehand, try out the tennis teasers and catch up with the updated tennis posts from the 1000 plus archived materials of Leaders We Deserve.

An earlier post also outlined a little of the contents of Tennis Matters

 


The Manchester Method: A Leaders We Deserve Monograph

May 21, 2015

by Conor Glean

In April 2015, Leaders We Deserve announced the publication of a series of monographs selected from materials published in over a thousand posts over the period 2006-2015 Manchester Method

The Manchester Method is an experiential means of supporting business education which was developed within The Manchester Business School, primarily within its MBA programmes.

It was chosen as the topic of the first monograph in the series, and published by Book Tango in April 2015.

To purchase The Manchester Method you can use various devices such as

Your Kindle/e-reader

The kindle app (downloadable from Apple App Store, Google Play, Microsoft Windows Store)

Or you can use this link

[£3.49]

To purchase directly from Google, search for “The Manchester Method” in Google play, or use this link

[£2.62]

To purchase in PDF, MOBI or EPUB form, use this link

[$4.99]

[Prices may vary and those quoted were available at May 18th 2015]


Thomas Cook Group faces serious risks to its brand image

May 18, 2015

A highly damaging story had developed following the way Thomas Cook dealt with the deaths of two children on a package holiday in Corfu. The personal tragedy also threatens the reputation of the organization

The developing story

Approximately ten years ago, a family holiday turned to tragedy.

Last week [13th May 2015] an inquest in Wakefield Yorkshire found a verdict of unlawful killing, and that Thomas Cook had failed in exercising its duty of care.

Thomas Cook responded by sending a letter of apology to the parents who claim to have seen it only through journalists covering the story.

According to The Guardian

According to The Guardian, The apology was reportedly sent by Thomas Cook’s chief executive, Peter Frankhauser, two days before it was revealed that the company received £3.5m in compensation from the owners of the hotel in Corfu where the tragedy occurred in 2006.

Christianne and Robert Shepherd, who were on holiday with their father and his partner, were overcome by fumes from a decrepit boiler.

Sharon Wood and Neil Shepherd said in a statement on Sunday that they had not received the travel company’s letter, and had only been shown it by reporters. “It is disgraceful that after all we’ve been through Thomas Cook are still putting us last in the equation.”

The popular press began to call for reparations from Thomas Cook to the family.

Background to the Thomas Cook group

Over the last decade the company’s fortunes have fluctuated wildly. The venerable firm of Thomas Cook was the prey of financial takeovers which resulted in considerable reconstruction, although the value of the historical brand has been recognized.

Harriet Green was appointed CEO in 2006 at around the time of the Corfu affair. Her leadership has been widely acknowledged as the outcome of an outsider successfully brought in with fresh ideas for rescuing the new company.

In earlier posts, I wondered whether she would be able to make an impact on the strongly entrenched corporate culture.

Hariet Green was replaced in November 2014 by Peter Frankhauser. The company stated that it needed someone more familiar with the leisure industry. Exit Harriet with a controversial golden goodbye, and promotion for the Thomas Cook insider from his role as Chief Operating Officer.

The sleeping crisis for the Company

For the company, attention to the Corfu hotel tragedy may have been replaced by concerns for more pressing strategic and financial difficulties. But the family fight for support began to attract media attention. Four years after the fatalities, [in 2010] the BBC had reported that:

a Greek criminal court [has]convicted the manager of the Louis Corcyra Beach Hotel in Gouvia and two other staff of manslaughter. The travel representatives of Thomas Cook were not changed.

Thomas Cook said in a statement: “What happened in Corfu was a tragedy and the thoughts and sympathy of everyone at Thomas Cook will always be with the family and friends of Christianne and Robert Shepherd.

“We have always maintained that this tragic accident was the result of a unique set of circumstances, none of which could be the responsibility of the company or [of its representatives]

“We believe that they should never have formed part of this court case.”

Further delays had resulted in appeals for the intervention of The Prime minister David Cameron before legal aid was provided.

An embarrassing development at the inquest

As the inquest proceeded this month, it emerged that Thomas Cook had received compensation from the owners of the hotel. At the same time, the company sent a letter ‘saying sorry’ to the parents who had themselves narrowly escaped death in the original incident. The parents claim they learned of the letter from journalists covering the story.

“We are all deeply shocked and saddened”

I have not [yet] been able to read the letter. The company is refusing to comment further, although through a spokesperson has announced how deeply shocked and saddened the company remains over the tragic events.

Questions for students of leadership and CSR

Can you ‘read’ the story in terms of dilemmas facing Thomas Cook and its leadership?

What might have been unintended consequences of the decision to remove Harriet Green as CEO?

How might you as a new CEO dealt differently with the emerging story?

Why?

To be continued


City Link: Jon Moulton plays the Fighting Talk game of defending the indefensible

December 29, 2014

TO BE UPDATED AS THE STORY DEVELOPS

Fighting talk is a BBC radio comedy programme which includes a challenge to panellists to defend the indefensible. Entrepreneur Jon Moulton found himself playing a version of the game defending the closure of the delivery firm City Link over the Christmas period City Link Van

The breaking story is the closure of the parcels delivery firm City Link, with likely loss of over 2000 jobs. The firm was acquired by Entrepreneur Jon Moulton’s venture capital vehicle Better Capital from Rentokil, in a fire-sale offer eighteen months ago [April 2013]. The announcement of the firm’s foreclosure took place on Christmas Day. Employees, many unsuspecting the news, learned of this through the media.

It’s their fault

As every lawyer, politician, criminal and naughty school-child knows, defending the indefensible is a necessary survival skill. Success in the game often involves finding someone else to blame, or finding a less difficult position to defend.

In a press interview, Jon Boulton was reported as saying that the Unions were to blame for the company breaking the news on Christmas Day. His hand was forced, he insisted, by a Union message on Christmas Eve. Better Capital intended to make the official announcement on Boxing Day [the day after Christmas].

Now look what you’ve made me do

The BBC’s Today Programme is a more refined version of Fighting Talk. In a radio interview, Mr Bolton had a chance to reprise his defense of the indefensible. He continued to insist that he could not have behaved in any other way, without breaking the law.

The official announcement which was made public [on 29th Dec, 2014] outlines the matter in legal terms.

Learning from mistakes

Mr Moulton has a knack of learning for his mistakes. His company was named Better Capital, allegedly as an ironic statement of intent to better the financial performance of earlier ventures. Other people including employees of firms acquired by Better Capital are the more obvious losers.

Dec 31st 2014

Jon Moulton reported as having offered assurances to City Link of funding support for a year in September 2014

January 1st 2015

Redundant workers told to check Face Book for job opportunities