Boris Johnson’s return. Operation Wrecking Ball

July 26, 2022

It’s a dream. A nightmare. Conservatives wake up this morning bathed in sweat, but it’s not a nightmare. It’s not fake news.

Return of the undead. Team Boris has launched a warning attack on the day Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss were preparing for the first WrestleMania battle for the crown vacated by Boris Johnson.
‘What vacancy?’ cried Jacob Greased Mogg, his long-time cuts manager.
‘They tried to steal his crown’, sobbed Dobbin, his overwrought corner-woman.
The cunning plan is revealed in The Sun, an out-of-hours drinking den favoured by derelicts and conservative lawbreakers:

A Bring Back Boris petition was close to reaching 10,000 Tory members yesterday, as anger mounts over the ousting of the PM. At least 9,150 true blues want Bojo’s name to be included on their ballots, alongside leadership contenders Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss.

It’s been organised by two ultra-BoJo loyalists – the multimillionaire Tory peer and donor Lord Crud, and ex-MEP David Campbell-Flagman

Lord Crud raged: ‘The ousting of Boris Johnson as prime minister by a minority of MPs is deeply anti-democratic. It defies the will of the country and the Conservative Party members who elected him. It amounts to a coup. I am ashamed this can happen in Britain, the birthplace of modern democracy.’

Meanwhile in an equally dubious diner off the M6, two figures are taking an early breakfast in a nearly deserted Motorway service station.

‘So we agree, then?’, the elegantly dressed man said.

His beautifully coiffured companion reluctantly nodded. ‘This baby’s not for turning. No, no, no!’

The emotion in her words sent an eavesdropping spy from the Sun ducking behind the returned tray counter. Operation wrecking ball has begun.

The haunting words of Miley Cyrus are piping out of the intercom.

I came in like a wrecking ball

I never hit so hard in love

All I wanted was to break your walls

All you ever did was was wreck me

[You can listen to the podcast of this post including my Karaoke debut at

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1945222/episodes/11022115%5D


Leaders we deserve: Choosing a new prime minister

July 12, 2022

Leaders we deserve examine the process and the leaders involved in the election in July 2022 of a replacement for Boris Johnson as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland

We begin with the build up to the election process, at the start of the Jubilee celebrations in early June

Wednesday 1 June 2022
What will the new month bring? A week of royal celebrations. A month in which a new Prime Minister is appointed?

Thursday 2 June
As expected. Near black-out of non-jubilee news

Friday 3 June
PM and Carrie booed by royalist crowd outside the memorial service. Commentators see this as dangerous to Boris Johnson, already weakened by the long-running ‘Partygate’ allegations.

Saturday 4 June
Repeated items of joyful Jubilee celebrations reduce news of the ‘Boos for Boris’ story

Sunday 5 June
The royal celebrations have transported the country to a land beyond time. It will soon be time to re-enter the 21st century.

Monday 6 June
Boris Johnson’s fate is presumed to be settled. The news swamps all other headlines.

Tuesday 7 June
Those headlines continue.

Sunday 12 June
More troubles for Govt plans and actions. Rail strikes, leaked reaction to healthy food study, refugee resettlement plans. Major financial backer claims Govt struggling with a Johnson ‘cult’.
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/jun/12/tory-donors-and-polarised-party-losing-faith-in-johnson-cult?

Tuesday 14 June
The first refugee flight to Ruanda has now become a focus for protests. The rejected food recommendations also retain potency. And the Titanic iceberg of cost of living and political realities get closer and closer.

Wednesday 15 June
The first flight to Ruanda postponed after interventions in the high court which succeeded but then halted by the international Court of Human Rights which stayed the Govt’s hand.

Thursday 16 June
A flurry of political stories. Mostly minor in isolation, but collectively damaging. Lord Geidt, PM’s ethics advisor resigns after being placed in an untenable position by the PM. Financial outlook worsens. The rail strike looms.

Friday 17 June
Boris Johnson pays an unprompted visit to Ukraine. Some criticism that it is largely self-promotional. A group of red-wall MPs were expecting him to attend a levelling-up event.

Monday 20 June
PM has minor operation, leaving Dominic Raab in charge of the Govt response to the start of the rail strike.

Tuesday 21 June
First day of the rail strike. Strange day for Govt to announce the removal of salary cap for top earners.

Wednesday 22 June
News headlines shared between rail strike and inflation figures.
Trump investigation has testimonies of Trump’s direct and sustained efforts to overturn the Presidential election result with ‘the big lie’ .
Major earthquake in Afghanistan scarcely reaches the news headlines.

Thursday 23 June
Happy Brexit day. For some. Sixth anniversary of the fateful vote.
The by-elections in Wakefield and Tiverton are expected to bring poor results for the Govt.

Friday 24 June
Dreadful losses to labour and the Liberal Democrats. Conservative Party chairman Oliver Dowden resigns, says ‘somebody must take responsibility’.

Saturday 25 June
The PM speaking to the BBC says he humbly accepts his share of the Govt’s difficulties. But the quote catching attention is that people shouldn’t expect a change in his personality.

Tuesday 28 June
Metropolitan police placed under special measures order by police watchdog. The Met currently leaderless after the forced resignation of Commissioner Cressida Dick. No mention of its investigation into Partygate.
Dame Deborah James, cancer campaigner, dies.

Friday 1 July

Hong Kong anniversary. Boris Johnson gives China a piece of his mind. Says he doesn’t use it any more.
Conservative MP Chris Pincher resigns from his Govt role after a sleazy night-club scene, and is quickly suspended from the party.

Saturday 2 July
National news headlines anticipate a wave of strike actions to add to the Govt’s problems. Its ‘don’t mention COVID’ policy is also being weakened by news of a 30% increase in cases in a week.

Monday 4 July
Headlines reports on growing dissatisfaction with Boris Johnson’s conduct, and on his falling poll ratings.

Tuesday 5 July
A mass shooting in a Chicago suburb at an Independence Day parade.
The Govt forced into further denials in the ‘what Boris Johnson knew about Chris Pincher’ story

Wednesday 6 July
News headlines are summed up as Johnson on the brink.
Remarkable day of political action. No of Govt resignations since yesterday clocked up 42. PM rejected pleas from cabinet colleagues to resign.

Thursday 7 July
Headlines: even more unanimous that the PM is clinging to power. But these were similar during much of June.
12.30pm. Facing multiple resignations Boris Johnson speaks behind the lectern announcing his resignation as leader of the Conservative party. It later emerges his speech agreed by a deputation was unilaterally altered in his actual speech.

The story so far

In the space of a week, Boris Johnson has lost his most difficult battle, which was of retaining the support of his cabinet ministers and the wider group of MPs in Parliament. He makes a grudging admission he has resigned as party leader, clinging to the role of Prime Minister in a temporary or acting Capacity. The action now swings to the process of evicting him, and bringing in his successor.

Leaders we deserve will be covering the leadership election. Audio versions of the proceedings can be found on the regular podcasts from TudoRama.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1945222


Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain

July 10, 2020

Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain, Fintan O’Toole, Head of Zeus press, 2018
Reviewed by TR

O’Toole provides an Irish perspective of Brexit. He brings to it an ironic style and viewpoint comparable with that of The Guardian’s John Crace. His central theme is an explanation of Brexit as a heroic failure, shaped in the English collective consciousness as failure dramatised as heroic, and implicitly through post-imperial exceptionalism, as heroic triumph.

Another Dunkirk moment

Brexit, he points out, is seen as another Dunkirk moment. Failure elevated to success, often associated with the Dunkirk spirit. He might well have added, associated with the will of the people. He compares Boris Johnson with Enoch Powell. I found that a bit of a stretch. I do not consider Johnson a racist any more than I consider Jeremy Corbyn anti-Semitic. (Powell I considered a deeply anguished racist at the time, and still do.)

Ironic distancing

However, O’Toole deepens my understanding of Johnson’s distasteful vocabulary by his argument that Powell and Johnson both cultivate a public persona of ironic distancing themselves from an era whose vocabulary they espouse. Johnson wrote of ‘the Queen being greeted by ‘flag-waving piccaninnies’. Powell wrote of a mythical old lady followed to the shops by ‘charming wide-grinning piccaninnies’. The measured archaic style is ‘something knowingly impish or unexpectedly camp, in his presentation of self’ (pp 100-101).’
Johnson’s language, O’Toole suggests, can be deconstructed as conforming to [Susan] Sontag’s definition of camp as ‘the love of the exaggerated…’ Just as Enoch Powell’s ‘weirdly arch manner ..gave a strange knowing theatricality even to his inflammatory racism’.
It seems the vivid vocabulary still deployed at times in BJ’s speeches is a reworking of a theme and style which included the invention of ‘the Brussels war on prawn cocktail flavour crisp. When the story is revealed as false, the schoolboy Boris is able to survive and profit from its exposure. A convincing explanation of how the child as father of the man escapes punishment.

History as nostalgic psychology

The demographics of the referendum vote show that a high proportion of older men with fewer educational qualifications voted overwhelmingly to leave the EU. Successive chapters build up an explanation  in what has become known as the psychodramatic approach.
It is a view contested by another Irish commentator Brian Hughes. In The Psychology of Brexit, Hughes considers the psychodrama approach as over-claiming the significance of England’s Imperial past and risking a treatment of ‘history as nostalgic psychology.

Overview

The debate continues. Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain is an enjoyable and thought-provoking contribution to the Brexit debate. I read it with pleasure for its fiercely expressed argument as well as its enviable style, which is as smooth as a well-known dark Irish beverage.

 


The yellowhammer dossier

August 21, 2019
Possibly the biggest story so far in the Brexit drama. The Sunday Times of August 18th obtains and publishes the government’s classified ‘yellowhammer’ report in full.
The headline reads ‘Operation Chaos: Whitehall’s secret no-deal plan leaked’. Across pages 2-3 is a quote from ‘a cabinet office source’: ‘This is not project fear it’s what we face after no-deal’.
The credibility of the leaked materials is reinforced by its appearance, hastily composed sheets, each page of which is replicated and emblazoned with a red OFFICIAL SENSITIVE stamp. The pages are surrounded with synoptic analyses of each of its fifteen points, by a team led by the investigative journalists Rosamund Urwin and Caroline Wheeler.
The consequences of a no-deal Brexit are chillingly outlined in a base scenario, and fifteen key planning assumptions. The journalists emphasise that the documents ‘set out the most likely aftershocks of a no-deal Brexit rather than worse-case scenarios’.
This has not prevented government spokespersons from referring it as a worse-case and highly unlikely scenario. Among them, James Cleverley has been in broken-record mode since.
Five critical areas
In essence the report highlight five critical areas to be addressed in the event of a no-deal Brexit:
‘types of fresh food supply will decrease’
‘Traffic caused by border delays could affect fuel distribution’
‘Medical supplies will be vulnerable to severe delays’
‘Channel port disruptions worse for 3 months before improving to around 50-70 percent’
‘N Ireland disruption is likely to result in protests’.
The significance of the report
Prior to the boisterous age of Social Media, The Sunday Times was accepted as a highly distinguished investigative newspaper. Recently, the credibility of such reports are dismissed, along with those of ‘so-called experts’ . One such dismissive voice Michael Gove is now the chair of the committee with ‘full control over Operation Yellowhammer chairing the Brexit war cabinet from No 10 Downing Street.
However, the authenticity of the report has not been denied. It has added credibility as coming from a newspaper not among the flag-bearers for opposition to the Government. If The Guardian, The Mirror or The Huffington Post had obtained the scoop it could be more easily dismissed.
In one way there is some comfort in the fact that the report has become public knowledge. it is in the nature of social science that awareness permits action and change. The tireless efforts of Michael Gove and the Brexit war cabinet will no doubt be redoubled to do what remains possible in the few months available to them.
Where does Boris Johnson come into all this? 
Curiously, it is hard to see what any leader can do regardless of charisma, insight, or credibility to influence the short-term consequences of a ‘no ifs no buts Brexit’ he has committed to.
To be continued …

Catch-up Part Two: The campaign to become Prime Minister

August 3, 2016

David Cameron ListeningIn Part One I looked at the developing stories from June 23rd 2016, the date of the European Referendum in the UK. To deal with the next part of the story, I have to go back to February, to the start of the months of national campaigning. 

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Catch up: Unedited notes for an unedifying time

July 21, 2016

I believe

 

For the last four weeks [Tuesday June 21- July 19] the political news in the UK has been changing so quickly that drafts of an unpublished post became outdated at least four times. Publication was then hindered for technical reasons. I have attempted to make  some retrspective sense out of my unposted notes

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The EU Referendum: Fate knocks on the door

June 23, 2016

June 23rd 2016. After a fractious period of debate, the voters of Great Britain head for the ballot boxes. Some for various reasons have already recorded a postal vote

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And the leader of the week was …

June 14, 2016

Chosen from the eight candidates battling for votes in the ITV referendum debates

The debates were two hours long with a similar format. The leaders had a brief chance to outline positions, then faced well-thought out questions from what appeared to be audiences representing the main demographics (gender, and political persuasion were particularly well balanced).

The moderator Mary Nightingale would have been a strong contender, managing as well as any to have ‘control over the borders’ of time permitted to the panellists obviously not used to such a treatment. (I was reminded of the approach of the horse whisperer Monty Roberts, which has a well-constructed but unobtrusive approach to keeping critters moving where he would like them to go).

How to rate the leaders

I decided on a context-specific rating approach as found in such reputable scientific journals as Which, Ryan’s Air best deals, Delia’s dozen best flans, Celebrity hottest oboists.

Three factors of performance

After some thought I decided that the key measure of the leadership performance was on the influence or impact achieved by the performance on three groups of votes.

IOU: Impact on undecided (to swing to his or her side or the other side)

IOS: Impact on supporters (to stay as supporters, become unsettled, or switch)

IOO: Impact on opponents (to stay, become unsettled or switch)

Given time and a research budget I would arrive at a reasonable set of scales for each of these three factors. As I have neither, I resorted to another approach sometimes known as first impressions to help me fill in the matrix.

I read as many articles as I could find about the two debates may have been influenced by them, or (more likely) my own bias which is more strongly towards remain than it is towards the politicians and their advocacy of their cause.

Candidate Impact on undecided voters Impact on supporting voters Impact on opposing voters Notes
Cameron 4-5 5-6 3-4 12-15 Same old same old
Farage 2-3 7-8 2-3 11-13 Same old same old
Johnson 4 5 4 13 Needed plan B
Stuart 5 6 4 15 Bit bland
Leadsom 5-6 4-5 4-5 13-16 OK but forgettable
Sturgeon 6-7 6 3-4 15-17 Most authoritative
Eagle 3-7 5-6 3-4 11-17 ‘Marmite?’
Rudd 4-7 6-7 3-5 13-19 ‘Marmite?’
Range 2-7 4-8 2-5 11-19

What if anything does all this mean?

It’s just one of the thousands of ways you can set up your own thought engine, to help you get underneath the surface of arguments. These matrix methods do not give answers so much as suggest new possibilities.

My interpretation of the debates is that we have no game-changing speaker out there at present. And, of course my judgement about the impact of a speaker is unlikely to capture the views of the voters be they decided or undecided.


George Osborne and Joe Root strengthen their cases as future national leaders

July 12, 2015

This week two leaders and their possible successors were tested. Alistair Cook opened the batting for England in Cardiff, and David Cameron started for the Government at Westminster

Here are my notes made at the time, [8th July 2015] which have been slightly edited for clarity purposes.

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Nicola Sturgeon named as the most dangerous woman in Britain

April 21, 2015

The leader of the Scottish National Party (SDP) has become the most targeted politician in the General Election Campaign. She must be doing something rightNest of vipers

The Guardian captured the awakening mood in the mainline UK political parties to the danger coming from Nicola Sturgeon’s leadership of the SNP:

According to Boris Johnson she’s King Herod. She’s Lady Macbeth. She’s Attila the Hun.

Piers Morgan in the Mail is more circumspect. For him, Sturgeon is merely “the most dangerous woman in Britain”. This, says Sturgeon, is “possibly one of the nicest things the Mail has ever said about me”.

The newspapers that carried these gentlemanly hysterics, agree that Sturgeon is a kidnapper, warning the UK on their pages that she is holding the country “to ransom”. The Times eschews such hyperbole, suggesting only that she is only going to hold the UK’s defence to ransom.

Gosh. Even if the SNP takes every seat in Scotland – and that’s not beyond the bounds of possibility – it will still only have one in every 13 Commons votes. If Westminster really is this vulnerable, then, really, it’s brought its troubles on itself.

The Evidence from the Manifesto launch

Your editor settled down to review the launch of the SNP manifesto [20th April 2015]. As there would be many reports of the manifesto, I decided to concentrate on the style of the new political star of the Election Campaign. What follows is my unexpurgated notes, (minor corrections for clarity only).

Style.  

Strong, clear, uncluttered content.  Unusually easy to understand.   Compared with other high profile figures in the GE, least evasive. Not shackled by the need to stay on message.

Dilemmas

Like all public speakers, had to speak both to supporters, and a wider constituency at the same time.   How to please the former yet deal with different possibly conflicting views of the important ‘distal’ audience?

Not either or, but both and

As I have argued elsewhere, effective dealing with dilemmas is often a matter of seeing through a block imposed by either or thinking.  Sturgeon demonstrated to process frequently, both in her prepared address, and in the subsequent Q & A.

The launch of the manifesto is taking place before an audience of her supporters, plus a regiment of journalists.  The supporters are there to provide the evidence of their own unconditional commitment to leader and what she had to say about the manifesto.  The journalists want good ‘exclusive’ copy, revealing something suited to their own ends about the leader and her party.

As indicated above, the SNP has been increasingly been presented by opponents including most of the press, as a fifth column, intent on winning seats to gain power in Westminster by propping up a minority Labour government and dishing the Tories. This in turn is intended to achieve another Referendum for Scottish Independence, and to a break-up of the United Kingdom.

It would have been a popular move to say to the faithful, ‘you bet your last bawbee  I’m goin’ta stuff it to ’em.’ (‘Hell, yes’ as Ed Miliband put it).  She also needed to reassure those who were paying attention to Boris and The voters that her opponents wanted to scare off enough to turn away from the SNP needed to hear quite the opposite message.  ‘We won’t cause any trouble and only vote on Scottish matters.

There are various ways of dealing with the dilemma.  Nicola Sturgeon neatly put emphasis on rendering unto Caesar the things that are Ceasar’s and unto the Scotland their entitlement.  The effect was to suggest a win-win process helping Scotland and the entire UK towards a socially acceptable and prosperous future.

 More Yes Anding

A second example of Yes And framing came at the start of the Q & A.

Sturgeon introduced the session by saying in effect: These journalists have their job to do. (Pause, as if to calm an easy-to-arouse border terrier sniffing out an intruder). They should not be badly mauled if you don’t like the questions…  Then a neat punch-line.  Of course, feel free to applaud my answers as loudly as you like. (They did).

The Q&A went well.  The press vipers were pretty much defanged.

Beyond the style

I refocused on the substance behind a pretty impressive presentation style.  Overall, it seemed to occupy the policy space Labour would like to have found itself in, but had chosen to retreat from.

 Her answers for the most part remained clear and convincing. Her dealing with the costing of her fiscal measures was perhaps less sure-footed.

Her emphasis on opposing and even ending austerity was obviously hugely popular for her supporters.

For all the clear victory in this battle, leaving the enemy in some disarray, the war is far from over.