Peter Carey’s Amnesia is more than Wikileaks without Assange

Amnesia
Book Review

I bought Amnesia by Peter Carey for Christmas reading, partly on the author’s track record. Also because the blurb promised a tale of a cyber-hacker which a back story of political intrigue in Australia including the revolutionary events of 1975, and current controversies around the treatment of boat people, a version of a wider issue of immigration policy confronting so many countries.

Release of The Angel Worm

Cyber-hacker Gaby Baillieux’s actions have been shaped by a turbulent childhood with politically and socially active parents and diverse group of mostly hostile school mates. Her acts of rebellion with super-hacker boyfriend Frederick culminate with the release of the Angel Worm, which also results in the release of assorted prisoners detained in Australia’s prison system. Worse, the effects are felt around the world wherever American organisations are responsible for security, which naturally gives a new meaning to The Land of The Free. Frederick and Gaby become public enemies Nos 1 and 2.

A plan is hatched

A plan is hatched by Gaby’s glamorous mother Celine and Felix Moore, a discredited journalist and formerly a besotted admirer of Celine. The plan is bankrolled by Woody Townes, a left-wing property developer (implausible, but not quite unbelievable), who is a more recent member of Celine’s entourage. Felix is to write an account of Gaby’s life that will save her from extradition to a place where no Angel Worm will gain entry.

Amnesia indeed

Carey chosoes words carefully. The Amnesia of his title indicates the way in which unpleasant and inconvenient truths are denied and forgotten. It was certainly the case for me, and the book sent me back to the story which has scarcely been referred to for half a century. The forgotten crisis demonstrated for perhaps the last time the ultimate control exercised by The British political system in resolving Australian internal affairs. It remains a live issue in Australia, and is a backdrop to the tensions towards self-determination so important today around the world, not least in the United Kingdom in the devolution debates in Scotland and elsewhere.

In Amnnesia, the story unfolds from the perspective of Gaby, as related to Felix, who reverts to type by stubbornly refusing to write anything but the truth. Various factors including the motives and intentions of Gaby, Celine, and Woody make Felix’s task increasingly difficult and dangerous.

More than Wikileaks without Assage

The book makes no mention of Australia’s most notorious hacker. But it is, anyway, more than Wikileaks without Assage. I chose to leak no further, beyond noting that the book was by far the most interesting one I read over the festive season.

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