Alex is not perfect but is a perfect example of situated leadership

June 3, 2008

Sir Alex Ferguson announces his planned retirement as manager of Manchester United. He represents, “warts and all”, a perfect example of situated leadership

In a now famous incident a few years ago, when approaching his 65th birthday, Alex Ferguson announced his intentions to retire. There was a sense of panic and loss, and a considerable period of upheaval followed at the club.

It was a perfect example of the manner in which a leader can provide a deep sense of security. Strictly speaking, it might be seen more as the evidence for a deep sense of loss and anxiety at a leader’s passing.

Today [Tuesday 3rd May 2008] Sky Sports broadcast an end-of-season interview at which Sir Alex announces his second going. It would have been a notable exclusive for Sky Sport even if it had not contained the news of his retirement.

As it was, the broadcast itself made news. Glen Moore in The Independent reported in advance:

Two more years. That is how long the rest of the Premier League title contenders, and putative Manchester United managers, will have to wait until Sir Alex Ferguson drives away from Old Trafford for good.

In the wake of United’s Champions League victory last month Ferguson, now 66, had indicated he would not work past his 70th year, which was interpreted as meaning he would retire in three seasons’ time. Tonight, in an interview with Sir David Frost, he fixes his retirement date as summer 2010.

The interview is a must-see for millions of football fans. It is worth a look for leaders and wannabe leaders as well.

A future post will take a more reflective look on the interview and at the leadership lessons to be gained from Sir Alex and his leadership story.

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